Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away. <3

Michelle Ann Baje Malana

 

medicalschool:

This early stethoscope belonged to Laennec (Science Museum, London)
The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by René Laennec at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. It consisted of a wooden tube and was monaural. His device was similar to the common ear trumpet, a historical form of hearing aid; indeed, his invention was almost indistinguishable in structure and function from the trumpet, which was commonly called a “microphone”.
The first flexible stethoscope of any sort may have been a binaural instrument with articulated joints not very clearly described in 1829.In 1840, Golding Bird described a stethoscope he had been using with a flexible tube. Bird was the first to publish a description of such a stethoscope but he noted in his paper the prior existence of an earlier design (which he thought was of little utility) which he described as the snake ear trumpet. Bird’s stethoscope had a single earpiece. In 1851, Irish physician Arthur Leared invented a binaural stethoscope, and in 1852 George Cammann perfected the design of the instrument for commercial production, which has become the standard ever since. Cammann also wrote a major treatise on diagnosis by auscultation, which the refined binaural stethoscope made possible. By 1873, there were descriptions of a differential stethoscope that could connect to slightly different locations to create a slight stereo effect, though this did not become a standard tool in clinical practice. Rappaport and Sprague designed a new stethoscope in the 1940s, which became the standard by which other stethoscopes are measured, consisting of two sides, one of which is used for the respiratory system, the other for the cardiovascular system. The Rappaport-Sprague was later made by Hewlett-Packard. HP’s medical products division was spun off as part of Agilent Technologies, Inc., where it became Agilent Healthcare. Agilent Healthcare was purchased by Philips which became Philips Medical Systems, before the walnut-boxed, $300, original Rappaport-Sprague stethoscope was finally abandoned ca. 2004, along with Philips’ brand (manufactured by Andromed, of Montreal, Canada) electronic stethoscope model. The Rappaport-Sprague model stethoscope was heavy and short (18–24 in (46–61 cm)) with an antiquated appearance recognizable by their two large independent latex rubber tubes connecting an exposed-leaf-spring-joined-pair of opposing “f”-shaped chrome-plated brass binaural ear tubes with a dual-head chest piece. Several other minor refinements were made to stethoscopes, until in the early 1960s Dr. David Littmann, a Harvard Medical School professor, created a new stethoscope that was lighter than previous models and had improved acoustics. The Littmann stethoscope is the model used by most medical students today.

medicalschool:

This early stethoscope belonged to Laennec (Science Museum, London)

The stethoscope was invented in France in 1816 by René Laennec at the Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital in Paris. It consisted of a wooden tube and was monaural. His device was similar to the common ear trumpet, a historical form of hearing aid; indeed, his invention was almost indistinguishable in structure and function from the trumpet, which was commonly called a “microphone”.

The first flexible stethoscope of any sort may have been a binaural instrument with articulated joints not very clearly described in 1829.In 1840, Golding Bird described a stethoscope he had been using with a flexible tube. Bird was the first to publish a description of such a stethoscope but he noted in his paper the prior existence of an earlier design (which he thought was of little utility) which he described as the snake ear trumpet. Bird’s stethoscope had a single earpiece. In 1851, Irish physician Arthur Leared invented a binaural stethoscope, and in 1852 George Cammann perfected the design of the instrument for commercial production, which has become the standard ever since. Cammann also wrote a major treatise on diagnosis by auscultation, which the refined binaural stethoscope made possible. By 1873, there were descriptions of a differential stethoscope that could connect to slightly different locations to create a slight stereo effect, though this did not become a standard tool in clinical practice. Rappaport and Sprague designed a new stethoscope in the 1940s, which became the standard by which other stethoscopes are measured, consisting of two sides, one of which is used for the respiratory system, the other for the cardiovascular system. The Rappaport-Sprague was later made by Hewlett-Packard. HP’s medical products division was spun off as part of Agilent Technologies, Inc., where it became Agilent Healthcare. Agilent Healthcare was purchased by Philips which became Philips Medical Systems, before the walnut-boxed, $300, original Rappaport-Sprague stethoscope was finally abandoned ca. 2004, along with Philips’ brand (manufactured by Andromed, of Montreal, Canada) electronic stethoscope model. The Rappaport-Sprague model stethoscope was heavy and short (18–24 in (46–61 cm)) with an antiquated appearance recognizable by their two large independent latex rubber tubes connecting an exposed-leaf-spring-joined-pair of opposing “f”-shaped chrome-plated brass binaural ear tubes with a dual-head chest piece. Several other minor refinements were made to stethoscopes, until in the early 1960s Dr. David Littmann, a Harvard Medical School professor, created a new stethoscope that was lighter than previous models and had improved acoustics. The Littmann stethoscope is the model used by most medical students today.

Nurses are the glue that holds much of health care together. Nurse practitioners can effectively manage 80% of primary care with outcomes that equal or exceed physician care. Nurse anesthetists manage care during surgical procedures, nurse midwives deliver babies, and nurses provide care in homes, clinics, senior living centers, schools, and hospitals.

Mary Jo Kreitzer, co-editor of Integrative Nursing on the role of nurses today. (via medicalschool)

Nurses!

(Source: oupacademic)

At a cardiac arrest, the first procedure is to take your own pulse

Im missing college days, too!! Kanang makasabay imong girlcrush sa elevatorrrr! Lol #repost

Im missing college days, too!! Kanang makasabay imong girlcrush sa elevatorrrr! Lol #repost

No to retainers, yes to prosthetics! Thanks Tita no more spaciiing #postdentselfie

No to retainers, yes to prosthetics! Thanks Tita no more spaciiing #postdentselfie

Yayay face since Sat, and tomorrow again :&#8217;( #dentsessions

Yayay face since Sat, and tomorrow again :’( #dentsessions

@silkaipage Good morning Hagz!! How I wish I could spend time with you again and celebrate with you today Happy birthday Hagz! Enjoy what you got today and tomorrow, you deserved all of that, loving family, successful career, blooming love life! Because you&#8217;re one of those good persons and you get to stay humble! Though always miles apart, I know we&#8217;re always there for each other. We may not talk that often, but I believe one day, mag bond ra gyud ta tanan to the highest level Haha. Im very very happy for you! Enjoy the day and most of all, thank God for all the blessings I love you! xoxo

@silkaipage Good morning Hagz!! How I wish I could spend time with you again and celebrate with you today Happy birthday Hagz! Enjoy what you got today and tomorrow, you deserved all of that, loving family, successful career, blooming love life! Because you’re one of those good persons and you get to stay humble! Though always miles apart, I know we’re always there for each other. We may not talk that often, but I believe one day, mag bond ra gyud ta tanan to the highest level Haha. Im very very happy for you! Enjoy the day and most of all, thank God for all the blessings I love you! xoxo

Dont like ER before it has changed everything. Seems its going to happen again! Pedia is not love :( How ironic, though!

Dont like ER before it has changed everything. Seems its going to happen again! Pedia is not love :( How ironic, though!